SPS 064: Fundamentals of Fiction: How To Write A Great Story & Build A Fiction Career (What I Learned From 7,000+ Calls With SPS Students) with Ramy Vance

Joining me today is Ramy Vance, who was one of our first students at Self Publishing School, who is now the lead SPS Coach and developer of Fundamentals of Fiction Story program. He’s written 29 books to date and coached over 400 SPS authors with over 7,000 coaching calls along with running a traditional publishing company. Gain insight and knowledge from Ramy’s author, marketing and tier one experience all wrapped up into this one episode!

Starting his own publishing company back in 2004, to teach himself how to publish his own book, Ramy’s publishing house did very well. When his wife announced she was pregnant in 2014, Ramy didn’t have his first book completed. However, he gave himself the goal of having his book published by the baby’s due date.

https://youtu.be/nOOUCPYm4KE

With 29 books to his name, Ramy considers himself a career author. When he is suggesting or looking at genres to write a book about, he thinks about the trends and fads of readers. “For example, in urban fantasy, there is a fad, although I say it has lasted long enough it may be a trend, for the academy, similar to Harry Potter style of ‘I have magic, let me go to school and explore that.’” Popular trends often fall into the romance genre.

So what genre should you write in? “Whatever genre gets you most excited. It’s whatever you wake up every morning and say, I can’t wait to write that page. This is what I like to read and what I like to engage in.” Besides, you must understand the market, understand what your readers are looking for, and figure out how you can be unique or special in that area, Ramy suggests.

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We also cover topics that are crucial to fiction book success, including: the five points you must have in your fiction story, how to find your tier one for marketing your fiction book, and the four elements to becoming a successful fiction writer.

Listen in to find out how to carve your own niche, tips, and hacks to write a good fiction book, and how to find a twist or angle from your premise-level perspective. Learn common mistakes made by a fiction author, the five common mistakes fiction authors repeatedly make, and how you should take constructive criticism from a writing coach.

Show Notes

  • [02:18] Ramy tells his story of how he decided to write his first fiction book.
  • [04:13] His experiences which led him to create a fiction course for SPS.
  • [06:13] How Ramy selects his next genre to write his book. 
  • [08:35] Are some fiction genres more lucrative than others?
  • [10:35] The purpose of cyberstalking successful authors. 
  • [12:00] How to write your story from a premise-level perspective.
  • [14:00] Differences between fiction and non-fiction writing. 
  • [16:09] Five mistakes fiction authors commonly make when writing their book.
  • [19:42] How to successfully take in feedback from your book coach or another person.
  • [23:19] The five part story structure online class available for free from SPS.
  • [24:37] Two hardest parts of writing a fiction book. 
  • [27:30] How marketing a fiction book is different than marketing a non-fiction book.
  • [29:50] One thing that will highly impact your fiction marketing. 
  • [33:20] The importance of copyright in your book. 
  • [35:38] Four elements to becoming a successful fiction writer. 
  • [37:20] Ramy’s recommendations for lead magnets for your fiction book. 
  • [40:00] Bucket list items books and career writer book ideas.
  • [43:25] Tips on how to become a successful career author.
  • [51:06] How to use good storytelling when pitching your non-fiction book.

Links and Resources

Darrell Darnell

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