SPS 017: How I Went From #1 NYT Book Launch to $5.1M Product Launch with Jeff Walker

Welcome to episode 17 of the Self-Publishing School podcast. Today, I am joined by Jeff Walker the #1 New York Times Bestselling Author of Launch: An Internet Millionaire’s Secret Formula To Sell Almost Anything Online, Build A Business You Love, And Live The Life Of Your Dreams. Jeff’s launch strategies have transformed the way products are sold online. Before he started talking about his product launch formula, there was almost nobody else talking about product launches. The idea of a million dollar launch even seemed ludicrous, but now no one even bats an eye at a million dollar launch.
 
His techniques aren’t just for gurus or people with established platforms. He has helped thousands of students in hundreds of different niches, and they have generated over 500 million dollars in sales using the product launch formula. His book launch was a huge success and we are going to dive into that and the impact it had on his business and The Product Launch Formula itself. We also learn how Jeff was involved in online business since 1996 and created The Product Launch Formula in 2005, and how he hopes the book will cement his legacy.
 

You can find Jeff here:
Jeff Walker Website
Product Launch Formula
The Launch Book

Show Notes
 
[01:46] Why Jeff wrote and published Launch. He began online business in 1996 and became really good at launches.
[02:04] In 2005, he began teaching launches through the Product Launch Formula.
[03:05] Jeff wrote the book to get credit for his Product Launch Formula that he created. He also did it for legacy.
[04:43] He also wanted to help people and generate leads for his course.
[05:29] Writing the book was a challenge because he was obsessed with making it a good book.
[07:03] How writing and editing at the same time wastes time.
[08:02] Jeff used early morning writing time on his writing days to get his writing done.
[09:06] He used relaxed melodies and binaural beats for 50 minutes at a time. Then a 10-minute break and then back on for another 50 minutes.
[10:53] Having a big following and a large list helped make the marketing easier. He also used JV partners and affiliates.
[11:55] During a launch you shine every asset you have on your book or product.
[12:22] If you don’t have a list, start one now.
[13:40] He used a 99designs contest for an awesome book cover. Then he let his community vote on the best cover which was great publicity for the book.
[15:36] He also created an unboxing video of his first box of books being opened.
[16:14] The pre launch gets people engaged and excited. Then he had a pre-sale launch with bonuses.
[17:44] He also tested upsells to use with the book like his list-building course.
[21:35] Then he ran a special on The Product Launch Formula.
[23:38] How the book has impacted future launches of The Product Launch Formula.
[24:19] There is one PLF launch a year, the year after the book launch PLF increased by a million dollars.
[25:12] Then it increased, even more, the following year up to 5.1 million.
[26:10] PLF is a process that romances people into the sale with content.
[29:02] The launch ends when you pull the product or when the price goes up or when the bonuses go away.
[29:56] For books or lower priced items deliver value ahead of time and get people excited.
[32:30] Sustaining sales and gaining momentum.
[35:53] How Jeff doubled up marketing efforts to try and make the New York Times Bestseller list.
[37:28] To get a bestseller make a great book.
[39:02] The book has case studies that drive readers to Jeff’s website. This generates leads and they ask for recommendations through word of mouth.
[41:05] The book has impacted his business with high-quality leads and opt-ins.
[43:02] Podcasts and interviews are also a result of the book.
[44:09] Jeff ended up playing tennis with Richard Branson.
[44:39] Writing a book is hard and rewarding. Have discipline and write. Get an editor. Launch with a plan and build anticipation. Don’t stop after the launch.
 

Links and Resources:
self-publishingschool.com
Spsfreetraining.com
Relax Melodies App
99designs
Brendon Burchard
Michael Hyatt
Reid Tracy
Richard Branson
Jeff Walker Website
Product Launch Formula
The Launch Book

SPS 016: My Exact Process for Writing 16 Books with Joanna Penn

Welcome to episode 16 of the Self-Publishing School podcast. Today, I am joined by Joanna Penn, a New York Times and USA Today bestselling author. She writes thrillers and nonfiction. She is a professional speaker and entrepreneur who was voted as one of the Guardian UK Top 100 Creative Professionals of 2013. Her website The Creative Penn is regularly voted as one of the top 10 websites for writers.

Her site has a lot of great content, but today we are going to dive into her writing process. Joanna is a prolific writer, and she shares a lot of value. Her writing gets a lot of accolades, but she also has a lot of books out. She is known for publishing quality and quantity in the fiction and nonfiction arena.

After college Joanna became a consultant, but she was in search of the thing that she really loved and tried many different things. Joanna wrote a book about Career Change which ended up changing her career trajectory. In writing this book, she learned that she loved writing. She didn’t get to where she is overnight. It has been a 15 year journey. Today, we talk about that journey, Joanna’s writing, and more.

You can find Joanna here:
The Creative Penn
Books by Joanna Penn
The Creative Penn Podcast
Joanna on Twitter @TheCreativePenn

Show Notes
[01:30] Joanna’s journey began with journaling as a teenager. She studied Theology at Oxford and then became a consultant.
[02:25] Joanna tried many things like a scuba diving business and property investment, but she was searching for what she loved.
[02:36] She wrote a nonfiction book called Career Change. This actually changed her life because she learned about writing and publishing and she quit her job 3 years later.
[03:57] How reading a lot is important to understanding nonfiction. She wrote notes and made her first book up as she went along.
[04:53] She used beta readers for her first book and listened to their feedback.
[05:16] She also paid for an editor and cover design. She also learned that she loved the process.
[05:51] How working for a paycheck you don’t feel like you have earned anything. A book can earn and create a permanent impact.
[07:10] How reading someone’s book is like access to their brains.
[07:33] How Joanna’s first book really changes your life.
[07:56] If you enjoy writing books and you love the process you are a writer.
[08:28] Joanna’s passion was in the writing and learning and helping other people.
[08:47] Her business came out of a passion.
[09:38] Joanna’s writing process. She uses Scrivener. For nonfiction, she brainstorms the chapters and table of contents and then fills in the blanks.
[11:27] She prints out and goes over her draft and then gives it to her editor. Then her beta readers and proofreader.
[13:08] How writing improves over time. She is now a better writer. Every time you write a book you learn new things.
[15:20] Things that Joanna has done to be a better writing include using better editors and understanding flow.
[16:26] How a book needs to lead people through a journey.
[17:02] How Joanna also takes courses from people who are doing what she wants to do.
[18:02] How reading a lot is a great education. Read in your genre to understand how it works.
[19:06] The more book you write the more you earn. For writers, it keeps on going up.
[19:40] How she went from nonfiction to fiction and learned to tell a story. She started with NaNoWriMo.
[23:07] Choosing your mentors carefully and learning from people who do what you want to do.
[25:58] How with fiction it is more personal because you become part of the book. Fear of judgment.
[27:51] Writing the novel was “type 2” fun which is fun but it is hard work.
[29:19] How tiring writing fiction can be making so many decisions. It is work with a sense of achievement.
[30:59] Listening to waves and rain and thunderstorms helps relax Joanna when she writes.
[33:17] How it is important to get out of the house. Creativity is hard and needs to be done in the morning before Joanna is tired.
[36:07] Setting a timer and getting away and actually committing to writing. Learning structure and having a series also helps.
[39:27] Joanna uses a wall calendar to keep track of her word count. Our creative sides are children. She also uses stickers and adult coloring books.
[42:18] Balancing writing for her books and for her blog posts. She mostly focuses on podcasts now and writes for books.
[44:07] Joanna’s best writing productivity tips are using Scrivener and getting into the flow state with rain sounds. She also writes in the mornings.

Links and Resources:
self-publishingschool.com
Spsfreetraining.com
All About Joanna’s First Novel
Alastair Humphrey
On Writing Stephen King
National Novel Writing Month NaNoWriMo
The Creative Penn
Books by Joanna Penn
The Creative Penn Podcast
Joanna on Twitter @TheCreativePenn

SPS 015: How to be a Writing Machine with Steve Windsor

Today, I chat with Steve Windsor. He is a best-selling author who writes wild and irreverent thriller books. He also writes how-to books on being an author. He is also one of my earliest and most successful students here at Self-Publishing School. Steve is a writing machine. He writes quality content fast with his no nonsense, no BS, and sometimes controversial style. Many writers strive to be as talented and productive as he is.

Steve worked in IT and start-ups. He was always a good writer, and he always wanted to write. After a failed Google interview and being prompted by his wife, Steve decided to head to the coffee shop and give writing a try. His routine was to go to the coffee shop before it opened and then sit in the corner and let himself go inside and write. By writing about his own inner dialog, Steve learned to rip off every filter and crank out the words. He still practices this no nonsense style today. He also shares his methods for writing fiction and nonfiction along with a lot of other great stuff.

You can find Steve here:
Steve Windsor Website
Books by Steve Windsor

Show Notes
[02:04] How Steve began writing and became the writer that he is.
[05:31] Steve is a project oriented person who likes to see the finished product.
[05:51] Without a finished product, you have nothing to work with. He dives in and writes his first drafts fast.
[06:33] He consumed everything he could get his hands on and learned about dialog and writing.
[08:12] Steve blocks out large amounts of time and gets immersed in what he is doing and imagines the world he creates in his mind.
[09:22] Steve says he writes 15,000 words in a day using his immersive method.
[12:02] Some of the questions that Steve had to get past before becoming a writer.
[13:48] Going to misery school (your job) for most of the year. This caused Steve some hardcore introspection.
[15:32] Doing something for just money wasn’t the lifestyle that he wanted.
[16:08] Everybody asks if their writing will be commercially viable.
[17:18] Steve has been cranking out a book a month. He would do the writing in about a week.
[19:38] Steve’s writing methods for non-fiction.
[19:59] He wanted to learn story structure. There is story structure for fiction.
[20:43] How bad guys monolog instead of shooting the bad guy.
[22:03] There is a formula for writing fiction. Learn the basics, craft the story, and improve.
[23:09] How Steve would plot out the novel and put the points in the proper place. Then he would focus on those areas. Being immersed in the world Steve stays in the zone and doesn’t stop.
[24:53] How writing through structure helps him to keep focus and control the story.
[26:23] To write decide that it is important to you. If that is what you are going to be then you have to dedicate time to it. If people put time and money into something that is what they care about.
[28:07] Block off a day to get immersed in the world. Take 3 days and go to the coffee shop from 4:30 am until the afternoon or evening.
[30:13] Finding a sacred place to write. Steve likes a coffee shop, but he has written just about everywhere.
[31:40] Self-Publishing School helped Steve hone his writing skills and discover how to market his books.
[34:34] Challenge yourself to write as much as you can. There is no reason why you can’t put out a lot of content. Human beings can do amazing stuff.
[35:43] There is a lot of competition with fiction. Fiction makes more money once you figure it out, but it’s a long haul game.
[38:50] Getting over the fear that you can do it. Learning the mechanics. Practice becoming a good writer.
[39:59] Non-fiction takes a little less practice than fiction.38:01] The core problem that fiction is solving is boredom.
[42:33] Turning nonfiction books into solid info without fluff.
[43:56] How there is a need for nonfiction books especially those that encourage would be writers.
[46:29] Once you start writing and know the path your confidence level will go up.
[49:05] Get started now if you want to write a book. Just do it. Find a community and it will be easier.

Links and Resources:
self-publishingschool.com
Spsfreetraining.com
Russell Blake
Story Engineering
Steve Windsor Website
Books by Steve Windsor

how to get isbn

How to Get an ISBN: Cracking the Code for Self-Publishers

Did you ever wonder what that string of numbers is all about on the back of books carried in bookstores, libraries, or online stores such as Amazon? Have you also wondered how to get an ISBN? That 13-digit number is used to identify a book title, in a specific format, from a certain publisher, for the purpose of identification and inventory control.

The acronym ISBN stands for “International Standard Book Number” and, before it was implemented in 1967, the method and system for cataloging, ordering, organizing, and locating a specific book was a chaotic mess.

In the early days of World War 2, when the Japanese military were sending messages back and forth, the allies needed to crack the numbering system to get an edge in the war and turn the tables. How did they crack the complex system? MI6 recruited young mathematician Gordon Foster to work as a codebreaker at Bletchley Park, where he would go through millions of numbers to look for patterns in the code.

Decades later, when the book industry needed a standardized system to track in order to coordinate the increasing number of titles being published each year, Gordon Foster was approached by WH Smith, a British retailer, to write up a report on how a standard numbering system would look for books.

This report led to the 9-digit standard book number which went live in the UK in 1967. Several years later this turned into a 10-digit numbering system when it was decided a system was needed for new editions and variations. Then, in 2007, the ISBN switched to a 13-digit format, and is now the standard for all ISBNs. Later we will look at what these numbers mean.

how to get an isbn

Reasons Self-Publishers Need an ISBN

The ISBN is a unique numeric identifier that is used globally to identify a specific version of a book title. Without an ISBN it will be almost impossible for your book to be found at the bookstore, local library, or online retailers. Although it is possible for self-publishers to get a free ISBN through Createspace, there are definite benefits to buying your own.

What Is an ISBN Used For?

The ISBN is a critical part of any book because it:

  • Identifies the specific title
  • Identifies the author
  • Identifies the type of book they are buying
  • Identifies the physical properties of that particular book
  • Identifies the geographical location of the publisher

Do I need an ISBN for my book?

This is a common question writers ask before they publish their book. You need an ISBN for your book if you are planning to have your title available in bookstores, available with online retailers such as Amazon or Lightning Source, and in libraries. Note that an ISBN is, as of now, not necessary for publishing an eBook.

But if you plan to publish multiple books and you want your publishing business to gain greater access to the global community, buying a block of ISBNs through Bowker is definitely the way to go.

How do I get an ISBN?

If you live in the USA, you have to get an ISBN through myidentifiers.com, run by Bowker, the only company that is authorized to administer the ISBN program in the United States. You can purchase ISBNs as a single unit or in bulk of 10, 100 or 1000.

If you are planning to publish more books, it would make sense to buy the bulk of 10 or 100 ISBNs. A single number will cost you $125.00 but in bulk of 10, only $295.00. For larger publishers, the 100 pack is purchased at $595.00. You can purchase 1000 ISBNs for $1500.

Authors and Publishers Living Outside the USA:

You can check out the ISBN Agency in your local area. ISBNs are assigned locally but are used internationally. Once you buy your ISBN and your book is published, be sure to register your title with Bowkerlink.

The bottom line is, having your own ISBN gives you greater control over your book as well as maximizing your global reach.

Free ISBNs vs. paid: Createspace or Bowker?

Self-published authors have the option of being assigned a free ISBN through Createspace, the On-Demand Publishing company that is part of the Amazon group of companies. While this is totally fine to do, in large part because ISBNs will add an extra expense to your book publishing costs, if publishing is a long term plan for you, consider buying your own ISBNs.

The main difference between an ISBN that is assigned for free and one you pay for is, in the case when a self publishing house issues the ISBN it is identified as the publisher. When you buy your own, the author [for self publishers] or the publisher is listed as the publisher. This publisher is always identified within the 13-digit ISBN.

If you print a paperback or hardcover book through Lightning Source [Ingramspark] you will have to purchase ISBNs to publish because they are not provided.

10 Common Questions About ISBNs: How Much Do You Know?

  1. How many ISBNs do I need? What if I intend to publish multiple books and multiple editions?

In this case, you would want to buy a block of ISBNs in bulk. With every format of the book and all future new versions, an ISBN needs to be assigned. If your book is just getting a few typos fixed up, it isn’t necessary to assign a new ISBN but only if the product changes format. If you plan to write and publish a series of books, each book in the series will need its own individual ISBN.

  1. Do I need an ISBN to sell in each individual country?

No, ISBNs are international. They are just assigned locally. If you live in the US, you can purchase your ISBN through Bowker. If you live in Australia, you would go to the Australian ISBN Agency to get your ISBN. In Japan, you would go here. For a list of the international agencies, you can visit the International ISBN Agency.

  1. If I create a series of books, can I use the same ISBN for all the books?

Many authors, both in fiction and nonfiction, have an ISSN number assigned to their book series. ISSN stands for International Standard Series Number. But, each book in the series will also be assigned its own ISBN. The ISSN can be purchased from the Library of Congress. The ISBN can be bought through Bowker, or your local ISBN agency.

  1. When do you need an ISBN?

If you are selling your book in bookstores, online distributors, wholesalers, or carrying in libraries you will need an ISBN. Self-published authors have the option of being assigned a free ISBN through Createspace, the On-Demand Publishing company that is part of the Amazon group of companies.

  1. When you copyright your book, isn’t the ISBN included automatically?

Buying an ISBN is not the same as copyrighting your book. ISBNs are sold through Bowker, but the copyright is filed through the Library of Congress.

  1. Is a barcode the same as an ISBN?

The ISBN and barcode are different, and they are sold as different products but both can be purchased through Bowker. The barcode is used to scan the book and includes information about that book such as the price [fixed] or the currency that it is being sold in. You need a barcode to sell your book online or in bookstores. You also need an ISBN number first in order to buy a barcode.

  1. Can your eBook be published without an ISBN?

Yes, it can be. However, you can assign an ISBN to your eBook, but as of now, it is not necessary to publish on Amazon. Your book will be assigned an ASIN number that identifies your book as a product being sold through Amazon.

  1. What is the difference between ASIN and ISBN?

ASIN numbers are used by Amazon to manage and identify the products they are selling on their site. An ASIN, Amazon Standard Identification Number] is the  number that identifies the exact product that you are selling. It’s a 10-character alphanumeric unique identifier that’s assigned by Amazon.com and its partners. You can find this on your book page. In your browser, the Amazon ASIN will be after the product’s name and “dp”. The next place to find this is in your book details [or product details] area of your book page.

  1. How many times can I use the same ISBN?

The ISBN number is a unique number for that particular book that can only be assigned once and, once it is assigned, will never be used again with any other book in the future, including second versions of the same book.

  1. Do I need an ISBN if I am not selling in bookstores, say, selling on my own at speaking events? NO. An ISBN is not needed.

How To Read an ISBN: What do the Numbers Stand For?

As of 2007, the ISBN number is made up of a 13-digit number. This came about in large part because of the large volume of eBooks now being published every year. Have you ever wondered what all those digits mean? If you are like most people, probably not. But to a book publisher, knowing how to break down these digits is definitely something you want to pay attention to. You can tell a lot about a book [and its author] by reading the ISBN number.

Let’s break it down and look at what all these numbers mean.

Here is the ISBN for a particular book:

978-1-545070-17-8

You’ll notice this sequence is divided into 5 number combinations. But the first three digits “978” indicates that this string of numbers is for an ISBN. if we remove these digits we have:

1-545070-17-8

First is the initial digit, in this case: 1

The 1 is the language group identifier which here indicates English. Either 0 or 1 is used for English speaking countries. These numbers for language identification generally range from 1-5.

Here is a list of the most common Group identifiers:

0 or 1 for English

2 for  French

3 for German

4 for Japan

5 for Russian

7 for Peoples Republic of China

It’s worth mentioning that the rarer the language, the longer the number identifier will be. For example, Indonesia is 602 whereas Turkey is 9944. You can reference the complete list at the International ISBN Agency.

Next is the six digit series: “545070” — This is the “publisher code,” and it identifies the publisher on any book that has this number series. This number can be as long as 9 digits.

“17” — This number represents the title of the book. The publisher assigns this to a specific book or edition of the book, such as a hardcover version or paperback. This could be a single digit or stretch to multiple digits.

8” is the last digit and is known as the #check digit”. This number is mathematically calculated as a fixed digit. This is always 1-digit only. This number indicates that the rest of the ISBN numbers have been scanned and, is calculated based on the other digits in the code.

How to Register Your Book and ISBN

As soon as you purchase your ISBN through Bowker [or the International equivalent in your local area] and you publish your book, you should register here at Bowkerlink. This is an automated tool that will add your book to Bowker’s Books In Print and Global Books In Print. I recommend you download the free PDF “ISBN Guides: Title Set Up & Registration” with step-by-step instructions on setting up your title.

how to get an isbn

The ISBN and Barcode

You’ll notice on the back of the book that the ISBN and the barcode appear together.The barcode is a graphic made up of vertical lines that encodes numerical information about the book. The barcode is not an ISBN. To buy a barcode, you have to purchase the ISBN first. The barcode is a necessary element for most retailers and distributors as it provides a scannable version of the ISBN. The standard barcode is known as the EAN [European Article Number] barcode. If you sell your book in bookstores, you must have the standard EAN barcode.

Reading a barcode: If you look at the picture of a standard barcode, you’ll notice two barcodes side by side. The barcode that appears on the left is the EAN generated from the ISBN number. The other number appearing on the right is a 5-digit add-on, called an EAN-5, that contains the price of the book. The first digit is a 5, and is a must for scanners to read. The 4-digits after the five indicates the price of the book.

For example, if the number reads 51495, this means the price of the book is set at $14.95. If the price of the book changes, a new barcode must be used, but the ISBN doesn’t change. This would only be replaced by a new ISBN if the book is published as a new edition or new version.

You can buy your barcodes at Bowker and they even offer a barcode-ISBN combo:

  • 1 barcode + 1 ISBN is $150.
  • 1 barcode + 10 ISBNs is $320.

Wrapping It Up

Now that you have a very good idea how to buy and use ISBNs for your own books, all the best on setting this up. If you want to be recognized as a publisher and have your books available to a larger global audience by registering through Bowker, consider investing in your own ISBNs. Think of it as buying a piece of property: You own it and it is registered in your name.

For more information, you can find out anything you want to know by visiting the official Bowker page or at myidentifiers.com

I will leave you with a simple actionable checklist for ISBNs.

If you want to buy an ISBN for your next book, here is what you can do:

  1. Go to the website https://www.myidentifiers.com
  2. Under the ISBN drop down tab, click on ISBNs—Buy Here. You can select 1, 10 or 100. For a bulk purchase, go to “Buying ISBNs in Bulk” and you can contact Bowker directly to discuss your options.
  3. Once you have your ISBN assigned, you can then use it everywhere that requires your ISBN number.
  4. At Createspace, under the “Setup” channel, you can choose to have Createspace assign you an ISBN. When you buy your own ISBN at Bowker, just put in the 13-digit number and Createspace will use this in your paperback.
  5. If you publish your paperback through KDP [Kindle Direct Publishing], you can fill in your number in the “Paperback Content” section of your book when you log into your bookshelf. If you choose to have Createspace assign you an ISBN, KDP will ask for your 13-digit number if you are transferring your physical version over to KDP.
  6. Register your ISBN here at Bowker as soon as your book is ready for sale. Download the free ISBN Guides: Title Set Up & Registration step-by-step guide.

Helpful Links & Resources

These links appeared throughout the post but here they are for easy access.

International ISBN Agency

https://www.isbn-international.org

ISBN.org by Bowker

http://www.isbn.org/faqs_general_questions

Bowkerlink Publisher Access System

https://commerce.bowker.com/corrections/common/home.asp

Bowker Identifier Services

https://www.myidentifiers.com

U.S. Copyright Office

https://www.copyright.gov

ISBN Set Up Guide

ISBN Guides: Basic Information

SPS 014: Before Book” vs. “After Book” with Brian Tracy

Welcome to episode 14 of the Self-Publishing School podcast. Today, I am joined by Brian Tracy, Chairman and CEO of Brian Tracy International, a company that specializes in the training and development of people and organizations. Brian is a coach, speaker, and bestselling author with over 45 published books. He has consulted with more than a thousand companies and has addressed over 5 million people in his over 5000 worldwide talks and seminars.

Brian has written and produced over 300 audio and video learning programs, including his bestselling Psychology of Achievement. He speaks to worldwide audiences on the subjects of personal and professional development. Prior to founding his own company, Brian was CEO of a $265 million development company. Brian speaks four languages and considers himself a bibliophile and obsessive reader with a huge library of books. I am excited today, to talk with Brian and find out how he used his books to build a massive International brand and speaking and coaching career.

You can find Brian here:

Brian Tracy International
Brian Tracy Books
Brian Tracy on Twitter @BrianTracy
Brian Tracy on YouTube
Brian Tracy on Facebook
Brian Tracy on LinkedIn

Show Notes:

[01:55] After selling a million audio programs Brian was approached by a literary agent in 1978. His first book was Maximum Achievement.
[03:19] His second book was on selling, and he became the top sales trainer. Books help establish you as an expert.
[04:33] Brian made a decision to write a book every 90 days. This was 15 years ago.
[05:13] He reads about 2-3 hours a day and he has the intellectual capital to write his books.
[06:37] He writes for some of the greatest publishers in the world.
[06:57] Characteristic that determines success is long term perspective. Long term goals.
[09:52] Think like rich people and you earn far more money. The way you think changes your life.
[10:56] Brian researches subjects he enjoys until it reaches critical mass and he has enough knowledge to write a book on the subjects.
[11:50] Successful entrepreneurs help people, and successful books help people with great ideas.
[13:54] Brian’s writing process and how he expands chapters based on his knowledge.
[18:51] When to write your second book, after your first book. Just get on with it.
[20:58] In the 70s and 80s there were major book promotion industries. Radio and TV interviews were what you wanted to do.
[24:02] Being prepared to invest an enormous amount in promoting a book. Books don’t sell themselves.
[25:30] How self-publishing is great, but the books still need to be promoted. Put your whole heart into promoting your book.
[27:43] Brian has a 20 point system for writing a book.
[28:37] Brian creates videos and announces the release of his book to his mailing list.
[29:28] Brian’s publishers have a system for sending out announcements of his books and sends them to book fairs, and Brian will add a video to help promote. If there is an opportunity to promote a book he will promote it.
[36:40] You never know what will happen when you write a book. Brian turned a book into a bestselling talk called The Success of the Journey.
[39:07] Brian’s series of short books or small books that sell for $9.95 each. Each book has 21 ideas and chapters in it.
[42:05] Balancing being an International bestseller with a speaker. Brian Tracy is the most popular author in Iran, he makes no money from his books there, but he does get paid for speaking.
[43:51] How being an author establishes you as an expert and your income doubles after writing a book.
[45:14] How to have proven success formulas.
[46:33] To write on a subject, you must know 10 words for every word you write. Really know your subject matter. Put in 300 hours on your subject.
[53:53] Maximum Achievement is Brian’s favorite book he has written. It changes people’s lives.
[58:04] Save yourself years of hard work, by learning how to write a book before you write. You can learn any skill you want to achieve anything you want.

Links and Resources:

self-publishingschool.com
Spsfreetraining.com
Edward Banfield Long Term Success
Winning Through Intimidation
Your Erroneous Zones
One Minute Manager
Tom Clancy Novels
The Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway
Brian Tracy International
Brian Tracy Books
Brian Tracy on Twitter @BrianTracy
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