Social media is the perfect way for authors to promote their books. It’s free, easy to use, and a dynamic way to grow your audience. In fact, with the right posts, if you go viral, you can explode your audience overnight.

Before your book is even finished, you can start a social media campaign to promote your book. That’s a mouthful, and if you’re new to social media or to book promotions, you may find that phrase alarming. “CAMPAIGN” implies a lot of work.

Don’t be mentally derailed by the notion of a “social media campaign.” Using social media is not rocket science nor brain surgery (in fact, if you need a quick and dirty course on Instagram, just shoulder tap the nearest 12-year-old). In basic terms, it means interacting with people who like you, like your work, and want to read your book.

There are thousands of articles on the dos and dont’s of social media, but here’s what we’re here to tell you: You’re going to figure out what works for you and what doesn’t and go from there. Social media is a fluid, evolving forum, so don’t feel like you’re locking yourself into a strategy or road map.

In fact the more flexible you are to changes along the way, the better social media may work for your promotions, since you’ll be keeping pace with what’s trending and your finger on the pulse of your audience’s needs and wants.

Without further ado, here’s what you need to do to get social media working for you and your book sales:

1. Start Last Week

Or right now. Building a strong social media presence can take months, so don’t wait until you’re done with your book to move the marketing along. Ideally, you want to start developing a social media following before you even start drafting.

One of the mistakes rookie authors make is to wait to finish their piece de literary resistance before trying to build a social media following. No matter what phase of life your book draft currently is in—even if it’s just a wicked gleam in your author eye—NOW is the right time to build your social media presence.

Think about it: when you’re building anticipation as you work, it serves multiple purposes.

1) You can share with your audience how your book is moving along, and build steam so you have a bigger fan base when it launches.

2) You can interact with your audience and ask for ideas…for your book cover, your title, and even your character development. Who better to inform your book choices than your chosen audience?

3) You can keep motivation high to finish your book during the drafting and editing process. If you have a team cheering you on, you’ll be more likely to finish that project you’ve been talking about for weeks (or months, but hopefully not years).

If you’ve already started drafting, or even if you’ve finished your book, all is not lost. It’s not too late, but don’t waste another minute putting off delving into the world of social media. You don’t want to lose another day of free promos and audience excitement!

2. Pull Out the Big Guns

Social media is saturated with many different platforms. If you’ve never embarked on a focused social media campaign, then your head may be spinning trying to winnow down the choices and determine the right ones for you.

Here’s the good news: There’s no right way to do social media, and it’s a constantly evolving thing—so if it’s not working for you, then there’s no risk in mixing it up. If you are looking for a short list on what to focus on right out of the gate, you can’t go wrong with the duo of Facebook and Twitter.

Twitter and Facebook boast the most users and highest engagement numbers, so they’re a no-brainer to interact with readers, share your progress, and spread the news about any book events, signing, or the big launch.

According to Susan Orlean, New Yorker journalist and author of The Orchid Thief, “Twitter is a noisy cocktail party, with lots of chatting and quick interactions, a kind of casual free-for-all…while Facebook is a combination high school and college reunion and therapy group.”

Join those two parties and then branch out to the other social media platforms which support your book’s unique goals and purpose.

Do you have beautiful elements in your book, or along your book writing journey? Travel photos beg for the sun-dappled touch only an Instagram account can provide. Pinterest is the mecca for recipes and photos of food. (Do you hear us cookbook authors?) Are you a business type writing a how-to? Then hello, LinkedIn!

Explore what’s out there to add depth to your words.

3. Stay Positive

We all have that one person on our personal social media accounts who is an Eeyore. The sun is shining for the first time in three weeks and she’ll be the one to post a PSA about skin cancer, complete with close-up mole photos. Don’t be that person (unless you’re a dermatologist writing a book about skin care, then moles are fair game. Everyone else, steer clear).

Today’s world is heavy enough, so think twice before you contribute to the doom-and-gloom online. One of the toughest things about social media is the urge to purge. It’s tantalizingly easy to formulate a fist-shaking rant or negative thought and then disseminate it into the web without much thought for the fallout. That’s fine when your only followers are Aunt Sally and your dog-sitter, but when your goal is building your brand and your author name, then it’s best to tread lightly.

That’s not to say you need to shy away entirely from controversial topics, especially if your book focuses on the non-fiction genre (e.g. mole doctors). You may have valuable input to add on any number of non-light and fluffy topics.

We’re not telling you that there’s no place for serious information on social media, if that’s what your book is about. Just keep in mind that there’s a way to spin things online that leaves followers wanting more, and a way to spin things that leaves followers leaving your page in tears.

No matter the topic, try to post with positivity. You don’t have to be Ms. (or Mr.) Mary Sunshine 24/7, but your followers will notice and appreciate when you try to keep your posts away from the shady side of the street.

4. Don’t Feed the Trolls

The beauty of the Internet is that you can spread your word to thousands at the touch of a button. The dark side of the Internet is that strangers have cultivated a sense of anonymity and can consider any posts fair game for engaging in a war of words. It’s easy to feel baited by trolls online; some people enjoy pushing others’ buttons and they are darn good at it. It can be hard to turn the other cheek, but you need to consciously stay above the fray.

What happens if someone bashes you on your page? Nothing. That’s right, nothing! You’re better than this; ignore them. If that troll continues to flood your accounts with aggressive or angry comments, there’s always the block function. Use it. Don’t worry about alienating the “good” followers; by deleting the trouble-makers, you’ll create a more cohesive sense of community for those who add value to the party.

Remember: You’re in control. These are your business (or personal) accounts. There’s no reason to get weighed down by those eager to jeer and jab. Life is short and ain’t nobody got time for that nonsense. And if someone gets upset that you’re “censoring” (what amounts to abuse) and starts giving you a hard time for deleting negativity, well then…Delete, block, done!

5. Share Something Real

While you certainly want to share the news about your book, any upcoming promotions, and speaking events, you don’t need to make your social media ALL writing, ALL the time. Followers who like your work and your writing want to know about you…the real you. It will help you grow your audience if you show sides of yourself, other than the one serious side of Author-in-Training, LLC.

Social media was designed to build connections. Share what’s going on in your life, your likes, dislikes, personal insights. Have dinner at a fab new bistro and love the scallops? Post it! Traveling to Bali to surf? Post it!

Fans want to know the person behind the words, and allowing them tiny glimpses into what makes you tick as a person naturally builds a sense of rapport and connection.

Obviously, this is your business, so do try and walk a fine line. You don’t have to get overly personal on your author page and reveal so much that you’re uncomfortable. But a little insightful sharing about the man or woman behind the genius can go a long way. So much of the creative process is ultimately about connecting with others, so use social media to create and cultivate those connections.

6. Interact

Your audience has come to your social media accounts because they want to know more about you, your work, and your upcoming projects. Make them know that you appreciate their interest and attention by interacting with them.

It’s simple — like their posts, respond to questions, and let your audience know that their opinions and support matter to you. When you show them attention online, they’ll do the same for you, by sharing your posts and your work with their friends and followers. This will help grow your audience exponentially.

Like what you read and want to learn more? We’re holding a FREE online workshop where Chandler is revealing the exact tactics and strategies he used to write and publish 6 bestselling books in a row… and use them to build a 7-figure business in less than 2 years. Click here to save your spot now!

Chandler Bolt

Chandler Bolt

At Self-Publishing School, we help people write, market and publish their first bestselling book.We've worked with tons of entrepreneurs, speakers & coaches to help them get their book written, become a bestseller & use their book to grow their business.

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